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Lavatera cashmeriana planting/seed material

Family : Malvaceae
Habitat : Forest clearings, meadows, shrubberies etc.
Distribution : Himalaya : Kashmir, Gilgat
Botanical features : Perennial herb . Stem upto 2 m tall. Leaves 3-5 lobed, lower leaves rounded heart-shaped with 5 shallow and toothed lobes. Flowers bright-pink with dark beined petals on terminal spikes. Fruit of many black carpets surrounded by the calyx and epicalyx.
Part used : Root, Leaf, Flowers
Medicinal  uses : A known medicinal herb used in many Unani medicinal preparations. It is supposed to be used in throat problems. The herb is given as a mild laxative. The roots are collected in large quantities and sold as crude drug in market.

Lavatera cashmeriana
Qty: 50 seeds/pkt
Price Rs. 550/-US$30

Available at:
Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre
Ist street, Nambalbal, Pampore PPR J&K 192121]
Or.
PO Box 667 GPO Srinagar SGR JK 190001
Ph: 01933-223705
Mob: 9858986794
e-mail: jkmpic@gmail.com
home : http://jkmpic.blogspot.com

Belladonna-Atropa acuminata seeds for sale

Medicinal use of  Belladonna : Belladona is a native of Gilgat (Azad Kashmir). It grows wild/ground in the Kashmir to Gilgat. It is cultivated in Pakistan, IRAN,, Italy, India, USA, Europe, it is sparingly cultivated in Gilgat, Muzaffarabad. (Azd Kashmir. A. BELLADONA introduced in Kashmir and Gilgat by Europeans which has crossed with Himalayan

Cashmiriana Belladonna has very similar uses to the related deadly nightshade (A. bella-donna). The roots and leaves are used in India as anodyne, diuretic, mydriatic, narcotic and sedative. The following uses for deadly nightshade are also probably applicable for this species:- Although it is poisonous, deadly nightshade has a long history of medicinal use and has a wide range of applications, in particular it is used to dilate the pupils in eye operations, to relieve intestinal colic and to treat peptic ulcers. The plant can be used to treat the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, reducing tremors and rigidity whilst improving speech and mobility. It has also been used as an antidote in cases of mushroom or toadstool poisoning. This is a very poisonous plant, it should be used with extreme caution and only under the supervision of a qualified practitioner. See also the notes above on toxicity. All parts of the plant are analgesic, antidote, antispasmodic, diuretic, hallucinogenic, mydriatic, narcotic and sedative. The root is the most active part of the plant, it is harvested in the autumn and can be 1 - 3 years old, though the older roots are very large and difficult to dig up. The leaves are harvested in late spring and dried for later use. All parts of the plant contain tropane alkaloids. The leaves contain on average 0.4% active alkaloids, whilst the root contains around 0.6%. The alkaloid content also varies according to the development of the plant, being low when the plant is flowering and very high when bearing green berries. These alkaloids inhibit the parasympathetic nervous system which controls involuntary body activities. This reduces saliva, gastric, intestinal and bronchial secretions, as well as the activity of the urinary tubules, bladder and intestines. An extract of the plant has been used as eyedrops. It has the effect of dilating the pupils thus making it easier to perform eye operations. In the past women used to put the drops in their eyes in order to make them look larger and thus "more beautiful". The entire plant, harvested when coming into flower, is used to make a homeopathic remedy. This is used especially in cases where there is localised and painful inflammation that radiates heat. It is also used to treat sunstroke and painful menstruation.

Description of the plant :

Plant : Perennial
Height : 90 cm (2 feet)
Flovering : June to August
Habitat of the herb : Found at elevations between 1800 and 3600 metres.

Propagation of Belladonna : Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. Germination of stored seed is slow and erratic, usually taking 1 - 6 months at 10 C. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Cuttings of softwood terminal shoots in spring. Root cuttings in winter.

Cultivation of the herb : Found at elevations between 1800 and 3600 metres.

Known hazards of Atropa acuminata : The whole plant, and especially the root, is very poisonous. Even handling the plant has been known to cause problems if the person has cuts or grazes on the hand. The plant is particularly dangerous for children since the fruit looks attractive and has a sweet taste. The toxins are concentrated in the ripe fruit.

Belladona-Atropa acuminata Royle seeds are available at:

JK Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre-JKMPIC
POB: 667 GPO Srinagar SGR JK 190001
Ph: 01933-223705
Mob: 09858986794
e-mail: jkmpic@gmail.com
home: http://jkmpic.blogspot.com

Sage-Salvia cashmiriana leaves, plants ,seeds for sale

Sage is a native of Mediterranean area. It grows wild in the Dalmatian region of Yugoslavia. It is cultivated in Yugoslavia, Italy, Albania, Pakistan, Turkey, Portugal, Spain, Cyprus, England, Canada and USA.In Kashmir, it is sparingly cultivated in Gilgat, Muzaffarabad..

Sage thrives well in rich clayey and loamy soil. A hot and dry climate is not suitable for its cultivation

Uses : Sage is used in the culinary preparation in the West. The taste is fragrant, spicy, warm, astringent and a little bitter. It is used for flavouring meat and fish dishes and for poultry stuffing. Fresh sage leaves are used in salads and sandwiches.
 
Sage-Salvia Cashmiriana leaves for hair has been proven to boost hair growth. It soaks up excess oil and makes dirty hair look fresh. It helps in reversing hair loss problems, promoting hair growth, and strengthening hair for better manageability and shine. Clary sage Leaves  speeds up hair growth and prevents premature balding. If you are wondering about clary sage oil uses in your daily lifestyle, then read this article to find out its uses in aromatherapy, in preventing hair loss, and some simple at-home remedies as well.

The  sage leaves  is valuable for conditions such as:
Digestive Disorders, Female Complaints, Acne, Boils, Hair Loss, Skin Wrinkles, Excess Sebum,  Hair Loss,Natural Hair Products, Female Baldness, Shine your Hair,Split Ends, Dandruf, Male Pattern Baldness

The leaves and oil is an antispasmodic, bactericidal, carminative, antiseptic, deodorant, euphoric, sedative, and nervine tonic. As you can see, sage has many valuable uses in the field of natural medicine, but, interestingly enough, many of its traditional uses are for skin disorders. This is the reason why sage can play a large role in your natural hair loss program.

Sage leaves
Price: 550/-50 grams/pkt
(Other pkts: 100, 200, 500 grams
Sage Oil: 1 Ltr. 9500/-
Planting material are also available

JKMedicinal Plants Introduction Centre-JKMPIC
POB: 667 GPO Srinagar SGR JK 190001
Ph: 09858986794, 01933-223705
e-mail: jkmpic@gmail.com
home: http://jkmpic.blogspot.com

Medicinal use of Phytolacca acinosa

Medicinal use of  Phytolacca acinosa : The root is antiasthmatic, antibacterial, antidote, antifungal, antitussive, diuretic, expectorant, laxative and vermifuge. The plant has an interesting chemistry and it is currently (1995) being investigated as a potential anti-AIDS drug. It contains potent anti-inflammatory agents, antiviral proteins and substances that affect cell division. These compounds are toxic to many disease-causing organisms, including the water snails that cause schistosomiasis. The root is used internally in the treatment of urinary disorders, nephritis, oedema and abdominal distension. Externally, it is used to treat boils, carbuncles and sores. The roots are harvested in the autumn and dried for later use. All parts of the plant are toxic, this remedy should be used with caution and preferably under the supervision of a qualified practitioner.

Description of the plant:

Plant : Perennial
Height : 150 cm (5 feet)
Flovering : July to August

Habitat of the herb : Valleys, hillsides, forest understories, forest margins and roadsides at elevations of 500 - 3400 metres. It is also found in cultivated land houses, moist fertile lands and as a weed.

Edible parts of Phytolacca acinosa : Leaves - they must be cooked, and are then used as a spinach. Only the young leaves should be used since the leaves become toxic with age. The young shoots are used as an asparagus substitute. They have an excellent flavour. Root - cooked. Must be leeched first. Only the white root of the white flowered form (if it exists!) should be eaten. See notes above.

Other uses of the herb : A red ink is obtained from the fruit.

Propagation of  Phytolacca acinosa : Seed - sow autumn or spring in a cold frame. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. If you have sufficient seed, it might be worthwhile trying an outdoor sowing in a seed bed in early spring. Grow the plants on in the seedbed for their first year and plant them out the following spring. Division in March or October. Use a sharp spade or knife to divide the rootstock, making sure that each section has at least one growth bud. Very easy, larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found that it is better to pot up the smaller divisions and grow them on in light shade in a cold frame until they are well established before planting them out in late spring or early summer.

Cultivation of the herb : Valleys, hillsides, forest understories, forest margins and roadsides at elevations of 500 - 3400 metres. It is also found in cultivated land houses, moist fertile lands and as a weed.

Known hazards of  Phytolacca acinosa : The leaves are poisonous. They are said to be safe to eat when young, the toxins developing as they grow older. According to another report it is only a form with reddish purple flowers and a purple root that is poisonous.

For more details about planting material:-
Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre-JKMPIC
Mailing address: PO Box 667 Srinagar SGR J&K- 190001
Ph: 01933-223705
Call us: 09858986794
e.mail:jkmpi
web: http://chenabindustries.blogspot.com