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Sea Buckthorn seed/plants for sale

Himalayan Berry
Herb : Sea Buckthorn
Latin name : Hippophae rhamnoides
Family : Elaeagnaceae (Oleaster Family)
Local name : Kashmir Himalayan berry, Leh berry, Sea buckthorn, Siberian pineapple, Sea Berry, Sandthorn or Swallowthorn

Medicinal use of Sea Buckthorn : The twigs and leaves contain 4 - 5% tannin. They are astringent and vermifuge. The tender branches and leaves contain bio-active substances which are used to produce an oil that is quite distinct from the oil produced from the fruit. Yields of around 3% of oil are obtained. This oil is used as an ointment for treating burns. A high-quality medicinal oil is made from the fruit and used in the treatment of cardiac disorders, it is also said to be particularly effective when applied to the skin to heal burns, eczema and radiation injury, and is taken internally in the treatment of stomach and intestinal diseases. The fruit is astringent and used as a tonic. The freshly-pressed juice is used in the treatment of colds, febrile conditions, exhaustion etc. The fruit is a very rich source of vitamins and minerals, especially in vitamins A, C and E, flavanoids and other bio-active compounds. It is also a fairly good source of essential fatty acids, which is fairly unusual for a fruit. It is being investigated as a food that is capable of reducing the incidence of cancer and also as a means of halting or reversing the growth of cancers. The juice is also a component of many vitamin-rich medicaments and cosmetic preparations such as face-creams and toothpastes. A decoction of the fruit has been used as a wash to treat skin irritation and eruptions.

Description of the plant:

Plant: Deciduous Shrub

Height : 6 m (20 feet)
Flovering : April

Distribution : NWFP, Gilgat (Pakistan), Sonamarag, Pulwama, Kargil (Kashmir), China, NWFP (Pakistan)
Edible parts of Sea Buckthorn: Fruit - raw or cooked. Very rich in vitamin C (120mg per 100g) and vitamin A, they are too acid when raw for most peoples tastes, though most children seem to relish them. Used for making fruit juice, it is high in vitamins and has an attractive aroma. It is being increasingly used in making fruit juices, especially when mixed with other fruits, because of its reputed health benefits. The fruits of some species and cultivars (not specified) contain up to 9.2% oil. The fruit is very freely borne along the stems and is about 6 - 8mm in diameter. The fruit becomes less acid after a frost or if cooked. The fruit is ripe from late September and usually hangs on the plants all winter if not eaten by the birds. It is best used before any frosts since the taste and quality of frosted berries quickly deteriorates.

Other uses of the herb : Very tolerant of maritime exposure, it can be used as a shelter hedge. It dislikes much trimming. A very thorny plant, it quickly makes an impenetrable barrier. Sea buckthorn has an extensive root system and suckers vigorously and so has been used in soil conservation schemes, especially on sandy soils. The fibrous and suckering root system acts to bind the sand. Because the plant grows quickly, even in very exposed conditions, and also adds nitrogen to the soil, it can be used as a pioneer species to help the re-establishment of woodland in difficult areas. Because the plant is very light-demanding it will eventually be out-competed by the woodland trees and so will not out-stay its welcome. The seeds contain 12 - 13% of a slow-drying oil. The vitamin-rich fruit juice is used cosmetically in face-masks etc. A yellow dye is obtained from the fruit. A yellow dye is obtained from the stems, root and foliage. A blackish-brown dye is obtained from the young leaves and shoots. Wood - tough, hard, very durable, fine-grained. Used for fine carpentry, turning etc. The wood is also used for fuel and charcoal.

Propagation of Sea Buckthorn : Seed - sow spring in a sunny position in a cold frame. Germination is usually quick and good although 3 months cold stratification may improve the germination rate. Alternatively the seed can be sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe in the autumn. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow on in a greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in late spring into their permanent positions. Male seedlings, in spring, have very prominent axillary buds whilst females are clear and smooth at this time. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, June/July in a frame. Difficult. This is the easiest method of vegetative propagation. Cuttings of mature wood in autumn. Difficult. The cuttings should be taken at the end of autumn or very early in the spring before the buds burst. Store them in sand and peat until April, cut into 7 - 9cm lengths and plant them in a plastic tent with bottom heat. Rooting should take place within 2 months and they can be put in their permanent positions in the autumn. Division of suckers in the winter. They can be planted out direct into their permanent positions and usually establish well and quickly. Layering in autumn.

Sea Buckthorn seed/plants are available at:
The Jammu and Kashmir MedicinAL Plants Introduction Centre
POB: 667 GPO Srinagar SGR JK 190001

(R&D plant introduction centre)
Silik Road, Sonamarag, Kashmir
Registerd office: Ist street, Nambalbal, Pampore PPR JK 192121
Ph: 09858986794, 01933-223705
e-mail: jkmpic@gmail.com
home:http://jkmpic.blogspot.com

Taraxacum officinale plants for sale

Dandelion
Latin name: Taraxacum officinale
Cashmerian : Hand, Handri
Ladakhi : Shaanma
Dogri: Dudhli
Hindi : Dulaal
Synonyms:
Taraxacum vulgare
Family : Compositae
Distribution : Throughout Gurez, Tilel, Dachigam, Dubjan, Sonamarag, Gulmarag.Widely distributed in temperate and cold regions of the world.
Habitat : Grasslands,lawns, roadsides, pavements, vegetable fields,weed of crop fields
Ecological notes : Abundant in grasslands.
Cultivation of the herb : A very common weed of grassland and cultivated ground.
Status : common
Chemical constituents : Bitter crystalline principal-Taraxacin and taraxacerin; Phytosterols-Taraxasterol and Homotaraxasterol; Saponins.
Medicinal use of Dandelion : The dandelion is a commonly used herbal remedy. It is especially effective and valuable as a diuretic because it contains high levels of potassium salts and therefore can replace the potassium that is lost from the body when diuretics are used. All parts of the plant, but especially the root, are slightly aperient, cholagogue, depurative, strongly diuretic, hepatic, laxative, stomachic and tonic. The root is also experimentally cholagogue, hypoglycaemic and a weak antibiotic against yeast infections.

Roots : The dried root has a weaker action. The roots can be used fresh or dried and should be harvested in the autumn when 2 years old. The leaves are harvested in the spring when the plant is in flower and can be dried for later use. A tea can be made from the leaves or, more commonly, from the roots. The plant is used internally in the treatment of gall bladder and urinary disorders, gallstones, jaundice, cirrhosis, dyspepsia with constipation, oedema associated with high blood pressure and heart weakness, chronic joint and skin complaints, gout, eczema and acne. The plant has an antibacterial action, inhibiting the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, Pneumococci, Meningococci, Bacillus dysenteriae, B. typhi, C. diphtheriae, Proteus etc. The latex contained in the plant sap can be used to remove corns, warts and verrucae. The latex has a specific action on inflammations of the gall bladder and is also believed to remove stones in the liver. A tea/coffee made from the leaves is laxative.

Flowers :
Flowers used to make wines.
Other uses : A common vegetable relished in Kashmir Himalaya after cooking the throwing off the bitter water extract. Considered to be very good for ladies after child birth.
Description of the plant : Plant: Perennial
Height : 45 cm (1 foot)
Flovering: April to May
Scent : Scented Perennial
Edible parts of Dandelion : Leaves - raw or cooked. When used in salads, they are rather bitter, though less so in the winter. Tender young leaves are considerably less bitter than older leaves. The leaves are often blanched (by excluding light from the growing plant) before use. This will make them less bitter, but they will also contain less vitamins and minerals. A very nutritious food, 100g of the raw leaves contain about 2.7g. protein, 9.2g. carbohydrate, 187mg Calcium, 66mg phosphorus, 3.1mg iron, 76mg sodium, 397mg potassium, 36mg magnesium, 14000iu vitamin A, 0.19mg vitamin B1, 0.26mg vitamin B2, 35mg vitamin C. Root - raw or cooked. Bitter. A turnip-like flavour. Flowers - raw or cooked. A rather bitter flavour, the unopened flower buds can be used in fritters and they can also be preserved in vinegar and used like capers. Both the leaves and the roots are used to flavour herbal beers and soft drinks such as "Dandelion and Burdock". The roots of 2 year old plants are harvested in the autumn, dried and roasted to make a very good coffee substitute. It is caffeine-free. A pleasant tea is made from the flowers. They are also used to make wine - all green parts should be removed when making wine to prevent a bitter flavour. The leaves and the roots can also be used to make tea.

Other uses of the herb : The flowers are an ingredient of "QR" herbal compost activator. This is a dried and powdered mixture of several herbs that can be added to a compost heap in order to speed up bacterial activity and thus shorten the time needed to make the compost. A liquid plant feed can be made from the root and leaves. A low quality latex, which can be used for making rubber, can be obtained from the roots of this plant. A magenta-brown dye is obtained from the root. The plant releases ethylene gas, this stunts the growth of nearby plants and causes premature ripening of fruits. A distilled water made from the ligules (thin appendages at the base of the leaf blades) is used cosmetically to clear the skin and is particularly effective in fading freckles.

Propagation of Dandelion : Seed - sow spring in a cold frame and either surface-sow or only just cover the seed. Make sure the compost does not dry out. Germination should take place within 2 weeks, though 2 weeks cold stratification may improve germination. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle, choosing relatively deep pots to accommodate the tap root. Plant them out in early summer. Division in early spring as the plant comes into growth.

Dandelion seed/plants are available at:
The JK Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre
POB: 667 GPO Srinagar SGR JK 190001
(R&D Plant Introduction Centre at Sonamarag)
Admin. office : Ist street, Nambalbal, Pampore PPR JK 192121
Ph: 09858986794, 01933-223705
e-mail: jkmpic@gmail.com
home: http://jkmpic.blogspot.com

Ginkgo biloba in india

Ginkgo seedling at JKMPIC-Kashmir
Gingko biloba - Although not a cycad, Ginkgos also have an ancient lineage dating back to the Jurassic era, and make superb companion plants for cycads.  In prehistoric times it grew world-wide but today its natural range is limited to only two small areas in China.  

Once thought to be extinct they were found growing in monasteries in China where they had been carefully preserved over the centuries.  The leaves, taken as a tea, help to improve the memory.  A medium-sized tree with unique, fan-shaped, lime green leaves that turn pure gold in fall.

Two-year old organic per saplings, US$25/INR 1250/- (Open-polinated and organic)
Calibar : 2
Min. order: 25 saplings
Delivery : By AIR
Tax/Courier/Fright charges : Nill
Payment: Cash Deposit/DD/WUM only to:
Seed/Ginkgo tea leaves are also available
Plants are available in Polybag/without polybag

Ginkgo biloba seed/plant/leaves are available at:
The Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre
PO Box 667 GPO Srinagar SGR JK 190001
(Via New Delhi-India)
e.mail: jkmpic@gmail.com, jkmpic@yahoo.in
home: http://jkmpic.blogspot.com

Planting material available : Olive,Kiwi, Picanut,Hazelnut, and herbal seeds. 
more : http://jkmpic.blogspot.com

Goji berry for sale


Kashmir Himalayan Goji berry plant
Himalayan Goji Berry seed
Himalayan Goji berry juice is made from the Lycium Barbarum species of the Goji berry. This particular species is said to be sweeter in taste than other species. It grows in this mountainous region and that is why the juice is known by the name, Himalayan Kashmir  Goji berry juice.

Growing Goji Berries : The berry is a bright red fruit that grows on long trailing vines. The flower is mauve and blossoms in early summer. Although most of the flowers are violet or white, a few are pale blue or pink.As the summer progresses, these flowers develop into tiny red berries, growing more vibrant in color. The goji plant prefers damp, yet well drained soil that is rich with good, nutritious soil and sand.

Harvesting the Goji Berries : The Himalayan Goji berry is harvested by hand in late summer and the plant continues to provide fruit until frost. It can withstand the harsh environment of the region--frigidly cold, harsh winters and scorching hot, humid summers. In fact, goji berries grow at their best in such an environment. Goji plants grow best in a natural environment, where they can grow freely without too much cultivation. However due to rising demand it is now grown commercially throughout the greater region.

Himalayan Kashmir  Goji berry seeds are now available for sale
Price : 3500/-50 seeds/pkt
More details:jkmpic@blogspot.com
home: http://jkmpic@gmail.com
Ph: 09858986794,01933-223705

The Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre-JKMPIC: Arctium lappa seeds for sale

The Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre-JKMPIC: Arctium lappa seeds for sale

Arctium lappa seeds for sale

Buy Burdock Seeds
Burdock cashmerina
Latin name : Arctium lappa
Common Name(s) : Bardana , beggar's buttons , clotbur , edible burdock , great bur , great burdocks , lappa
Synonyms : Arctium majus, Lappa major
Family : Compositae

Budock is considered to be native in Europs and Kashmir; it is naturalized in the US. Burdock is widely cultivated in Eastern Europe especially former Yugoslavia, Poland, Bulgaria and Hungary. The plant is a perennial or biennial herb, growing up to 3 meters (about 9 feet), with large ovate, acuminate leaves, broad pinkish flowers made up of reddish-violet tubular florets, surrounded by many involucral bracts ending in a stiff spiny or hooked tip. Overall, these are rounded and spiny in appearance. The root pieces are used in teas and are very hard, minimally fibrous, longitudinally wrinkled and grayish brown to balck in color.

Medicinal use of Great Burdock : Burdock is one of the foremost detoxifying herbs in both Chinese and Western herbal medicine. The dried root of one year old plants is the official herb, but the leaves and fruits can also be used. It is used to treat conditions caused by an "overload" of toxins, such as throat and other infections, boils, rashes and other skin problems. The root is thought to be particularly good at helping to eliminate heavy metals from the body. The plant is also part of a North American formula called essiac which is a popular treatment for cancer. Its effectiveness has never been reliably proven or disproven since controlled studies have not been carried out. The other herbs included in the formula are Rumex acetosella, Ulmus rubra and Rheum palmatum. The plant is antibacterial, antifungal, carminative. It has soothing, mucilaginous properties and is said to be one of the most certain cures for many types of skin diseases, burns, bruises etc. It is used in the treatment of herpes, eczema, acne, dandruff, impetigo, ringworm, boils, bites etc. The plant can be taken internally as an infusion, or used externally as a wash. Use with caution. The roots of one-year old plants are harvested in mid-summer and dried. They are alterative, aperient, blood purifier, cholagogue, depurative, diaphoretic, diuretic and stomachic. The seed is alterative, antiphlogistic, depurative, diaphoretic and diuretic. Recent research has shown that seed extracts lower blood sugar levels. The seed is harvested in the summer and dried for later use. The crushed seed is poulticed onto bruises. The leaves are poulticed onto burns, ulcers and sores.

In traditional medicine, the fruits, seeds, roots and leaves of burdock have been used as decoctions or teas for a wide range of ailments including colds, catarrh, gout, rheumatism, stomach ailments, cancers and as a diuretic, diaphoretic and laxative. It has even been promoted as an aphrodisiac. Externally, it has been used for various skin problems.

Description of the plant :
Plant : Biennial
Height : 2 m (6 1/2 foot)

Flovering : July to September
Habitat of the herb : Waste ground, preferring calcareous soils, it is sometimes also found in meadows and woods.

Edible parts of Great Burdock : Root - raw or cooked. Very young roots can be eaten raw, but older roots are normally cooked. They can be up to 120cm long and 2.5cm wide at the top, but are best harvested when no more than 60cm long. Old and very long roots are apt to become woody at the core. Although it does not have much flavour the root can absorb other flavours. Young roots have a mild flavour, but this becomes stronger as the root gets older. The root is white but discolours rapidly when exposed to the air. Roots can be dried for later use.

Other uses : Some cosmetic and toiletry type products used for skin-cleaning, antidandruff and hair tonic applications are given in the recent literature. It should be noted that burdock root is fairly commonly used as a food in Asia. Occasionally, US health food stores carry fresh burdock root for sale as a food and nutraceutical (medical food).

Chemical constituents : 
They contain about 2.5% protein, 0.14% fat, 14.5% carbohydrate, 1.17% ash. The root contains about 45% inulin. Inulin is a starch that cannot be digested by the human body, and thus passes straight through the digestive system. In some people this starch will cause fermentation in the gut, resulting in wind. Inulin can be converted into a sweetener that is suitable for diabetics to eat. Young leaves - raw or cooked. A mucilaginous texture. The leaves contain about 3.5% protein, 1.8% fat, 19.4% carbohydrate, 8.8% ash. Young stalks and branches - raw or cooked. Used like asparagus or spinach. They taste best if the rind is removed. The leaf stalks can be parboiled and used as a substitute for cardoons. The pith of the flowering stem can be eaten raw in salads, boiled or made into confections. A delicate vegetable, somewhat like asparagus in flavour. The seeds can be sprouted and used like bean-sprouts.

Burdock Dosing :
There is no recent clinical evidence to guide dosage of burdock. Classical dosage of this herb was 2 g of root.

Contraindications : Contraindications have not yet been identified.

Pregnancy/Lactation : Documented adverse effects (including oxytocic and uterine stimulant action). Avoid use.

Interactions : None well documented.
Adverse Reactions : Allergic skin irritation on contact.
Toxicology: Burdock is generally considered a safe and edible food product. A few reports have appeared on burdock root tea poisoning (blurred vision, headache, drowsiness, slurred speech, loss of coordination, incoherent speech, restlessness, hallucinations, hyperactivity, seizures, disorientation, flushing, dryness of mouth and nose, rash, lack of sweating, fever) due to adulteration with atropine-containing plants.

Other uses of the herb :
The juice of the plant, when used as a friction, is said to have a stimulating action against baldness.

Propagation of Great Burdock : Seed - best sown in situ in the autumn. The seed can also be sown in spring. Germination can be erratic, it is best to sow the seed in trays and plant out the young plants before the tap-root develops. Seed requires a minimum temperature of 10°C, but a temperature of 20 - 25°C is optimum. Germination rates can be improved by pre-soaking the seed for 12 hours or by scarification. They germinate best in the light. The autumn sowing should be made as late as possible because any plants with roots more than 3mm in diameter in the spring will quickly run to seed if cold temperatures are followed by daylengths longer than 12? hours.

Cultivation of the herb :
Waste ground, preferring calcareous soils, it is sometimes also found in meadows and woods.

Hazards of Arctium lappa :
Care should be taken if harvesting the seed in any quantity since tiny hairs from the seeds can be inhaled and these are toxic.

Available pacakage : 50/100/200/500 seeds/pkt
The Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre
Ist street, Shaheed-e-Azemat Road, Nambalbal, Pampore PPR J&K 192121

R & D Plant Introduction Centre
(Sonamarag/Ramban)
Ph: 09858986794,01933-223705
e-mail: jkmpic@gmail.com
home: http://jkmpic.blogspot.com

The Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre-JKMPIC: Ginkgo tea for sale

The Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre-JKMPIC: Ginkgo tea for sale

Ginkgo tea for sale

Ginkgo biloba leaves tea : In traditional medicine, the ginkgo biloba plant has been touted to aid in memory function and circulation. According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, ginkgo remains an accepted medicine in Europe today with current studies under way for its benefits in treating Alzheimer's. The medical center notes that ginkgo leaves contain more than 40 compounds, two of which have shown antioxidant benefits: flavonoids and terpenoids. The former protect blood vessels and nerves from damage, while the latter help dilate the blood vessels and improve blood flow. Making your own tea from the leaves can help you capture these brain benefits in a warm, soothing drink.

Ginkgo biloba tea leaves are available in 50,100,200 grams simple pack.

For more details: http://jkmpic.blogspot.com
e-mail: jkmpic@gmail.com, jkmpic@yahoo.in
Ph: 09858986794, 01933-223705
Mailing address: POB: 667 GPO Srinagar SGR JK 190001
Contact : JK Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre. Srinagar/Sonamarg

Gingko biloba tree/saplings/seed/leaves for sale

Ginkgo saplings at JKMIC (R&D)
Gingko biloba - Although not a cycad, Ginkgos also have an ancient lineage dating back to the Jurassic era, and make superb companion plants for cycads.  In prehistoric times it grew world-wide but today its natural range is limited to only two small areas in China.   
Once thought to be extinct they were found growing in monasteries in China where they had been carefully preserved over the centuries.  The leaves, taken as a tea, help to improve the memory.  A medium-sized tree with unique, fan-shaped, lime green leaves that turn pure gold in fall. 

Two-year old organic per saplings, US$25/INR 1250/-
Calibar : 2
Min. order: 10 saplings
Delivery : By AIR
Tax/Courier/Fright charges : Nill
Payment: Cash Deposit/DD/WUM only to:
Seed/Ginkgo tea leaves are also available
The Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre
Ist street, Shaheed-e-Azemat Road, Nambalbal, Pampore PPR J&K 192121
Ph: 09858986794,01933-223705
e-mail: jkmpic@gmail.com
home: http://jkmpic.blogspot.com

Verbascum thapsus seeds

Great Himalayan Mullein 
Scientific classification
Latin name : Verbascum thapsus
Other Names :  Adam's Flannel, Beggar's Blanket, Candlewick Plant, Common Mullein, Flannel Mullein, Flannel Plant, Hag's Taper, Jupiter's Staff, Molene, Mullein, Velvet Dock, Velvet Plant, Woolly Mullin
Family : Scrophulariaceae (Figwort Family)
Kingdom :    Plantae
(unranked) :  Angiosperms
(unranked) :  Eudicots
(unranked) :  Asterids
Order :     Lamiales
Family:     Scrophulariaceae
Genus :     Verbascum
Species :   V. thapsus

Habitat : Alien, naturalized, biennial herb. Widely distributed plant, being found all over Europe and in temperate Asia as far as the Himalayas, and in North America it is exceedingly abundant. Great Mullein is found growing on hedge-banks, by roadsides and on waste ground, more especially on gravel, sand or chalk. Sunny positions in uncultivated fields and especially on dry soils. It is also found in Gilgat, Afghanistan and IRAN

Properties :
Great Mullein has been used as an alternative medicine for centuries, and in many countries throughout the world, the value of Great Mullein as a proven medicinal herb is now backed by scientific evidence. Some valuable constituents contained in Mullein are Coumarin and Hesperidin, they exhibit many healing abilities. Research indicates some of the uses as analgesic, antihistaminic, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antioxidant, antiviral, bacteristat, cardio-depressant, estrogenic, fungicide, hypnotic, sedative and pesticide are valid.

An infusion is taken internally in the treatment of a wide range of chest complaints and also to treat diarrhea and bleeding of the lungs and bowels. The leaves, root, and the flowers are anodyne, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic, astringent, demulcent, diuretic, emollient, expectorant, nervine, and vulnerary.

Mullein oil is a very medicinal and valuable destroyer of disease germs. An infusion of the flowers in olive oil is used as earache drops, or as a local application in the treatment of piles and other mucous membrane inflammations. This infusion is a strong antibacterial. The oil being used to treat gum and mouth ulcers is very effective. A decoction of the roots is used to alleviate toothache and also relieve cramps and convulsions. It is also used in alternative medicine for the treatment of migraine headaches accompanied with oppression of the ear.

The whole plant possess slightly sedative and narcotic properties. The seeds are considered toxic. They have been historically used as a narcotic and also contain saponins.

The dried leaves are sometimes smoked to relieve the irritation of the respiratory mucus membranes, and the hacking cough of consumption. They can be employed with equal benefit when made into cigarettes, for asthma and spasmodic coughs in general. Externally, a medicinal poultice of the leaves is applied to sunburn, ulcers, tumors and piles.

Other uses :
Dye, Insecticide, Insulation, Lighting, Tinder, Wick. A yellow dye is made from the flowers by boiling them in water. When used with dilute sulphuric acid they produce a rather permanent green dye, this becomes brown with the addition of alkalis. An infusion of the flowers is sometimes used to dye the hair a golden color. The leaves contain rotenone, which is used as an insecticide. The dried leaves are highly flammable and can be used to ignite a fire quickly , or as wick for candles.

Folklore : An old superstition existed that witches used lamps and candles provided with wicks of Mullein in their incantations, and another of the plant's many names, 'Hag's Taper', refers to this. Both in Europe and Asia the power of driving away evil spirits was ascribed to the Mullein. Being a sure safeguard against evil spirits and magic, and from the ancient classics, it was this plant which Ulysses took to protect himself against the wiles of Circe.

Recipes : Tea: An aromatic tea can be made by boiling 1 tbs. dried leaves or root, in 1 cup water for 5 - 10 min. A sweeter tea can be made by infusing the fresh or dried flowers. Or for children and the elderly use milk instead of water. Sweeten if desired.

Mullein oil : Use flowers or root. Place in blender or crush, fill jar, cover with olive oil, set in warm place for 2 weeks. Strain before use.

Medicinal use of Great Mullein :
Great mullein is a commonly used domestic herbal remedy, valued for its efficacy in the treatment of pectoral complaints. It acts by reducing the formation of mucus and stimulating the coughing up of phlegm, and is a specific treatment for tracheitis and bronchitis. The leaves and the flowers are anodyne, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic, astringent, demulcent, diuretic, emollient, expectorant and vulnerary. An infusion is taken internally in the treatment of a wide range of chest complaints and also to treat diarrhoea. The plant combines well with other expectorants such as coltsfoot (Tussilago farfara) and thyme (Thymus vulgaris). Externally, a poultice of the leaves is a good healer of wounds and is also applied to ulcers, tumours and piles. Any preparation made from the leaves needs to be carefully strained in order to remove the small hairs which can be an irritant. The plant is harvested when in flower and is dried for later use. An infusion of the flowers in olive oil is used as earache drops, or as a local application in the treatment of piles and other mucous membrane inflammations. This infusion is also strongly bactericidal. A decoction of the roots is said to alleviate toothache and also relieve cramps and convulsions. The juice of the plant and powder made from the dried roots is said to quickly remove rough warts when rubbed on them. It is not thought to be so useful for smooth warts. The seeds are slightly narcotic and also contain saponins. A poultice made from the seeds and leaves is used to draw out splinters. A decoction of the seeds is used to soothe chilblains and chapped skin. A homeopathic remedy is made from the fresh leaves. It is used in the treatment of long-standing headaches accompanied with oppression of the ear.

Description of the plant:


Plant : Biennial
Height : 180 cm (6 feet)
Flovering : June to August

Habitat of the herb : Sunny positions in uncultivated fields and waste ground, especially on dry soils.

Edible parts of Great Mullein :
An aromatic, slightly bitter tea can be made by infusing the dried leaves in boiling water for 5 - 10 minutes. A sweeter tea can be made by infusing the fresh or dried flowers.

Other uses of the herb :
A yellow dye is obtained from the flowers by boiling them in water. When used with dilute sulphuric acid they produce a rather permanent green dye, this becomes brown with the addition of alkalis. An infusion of the flowers is sometimes used to dye the hair a golden colour. The flowering stems can be dipped in wax and used as torches. The down on the leaves and stems makes an excellent tinder when quite dry. It is also used as an insulation in shoes to keep the feet warm and to make wicks for candle. One report says that the leaves contain rotenone, though it does not say in what quantity. Rotenone is used as an insecticide.

Propagation of Great Mullein : Seed - sow late spring to early summer in a cold frame and only just cover the seed. Germination usually takes place within 2 - 3 weeks. When they are large enough to handle, prick out the seedlings into individual pots and plant them out in late summer. The seed has a long viability.

Cultivation of the herb : Sunny positions in uncultivated fields and waste ground, especially on dry soils.

Great Himalayan Mullein plant and seed materials are available at:

The Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre
POB: 667 GPO Srinagar SGR JK 190001
Ph: 09858986794, 01933-223705
e-mail: jkmpic@gmail.com
home: http://jkmpic.blogspot.com

Ashvagandha seeds for sale

Withania somnifera
Syn. Physalis flexuosa
Regional Syn : (E) Winter cherry (S) Ashavagandha
(H) Asgandh (B) Ashvagandha, (Qashmirian) Iskand,
(G) Ashvagandha, Asoda, Ghodasoda (T) Ammukira.
Part Used : Root, Leaves.
Constituents : Alkaloids; Sominiferin and three Alkaloids;
Phytosterol.
Action/Uses : Plant; tonic, alterative, astringent, aphrodisiac, nervine sedative. Leaf
& Root; narcotic. Root; diuretic, tonic, alterative, aphrodisiac.
Used in; Root; in rheumatic swelling.

100/200/500/100 seeds/pkt
(Ashwagandha seeds are organic and Open-polinated)
Ashvagandha seed materials are available at :
The JK Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre
POB: 667 GPO Srinagar SGR JK 190001
R&D Plant Introduction Centre (Sonamarag)
Ph: 01933-223705
Mob: 09858986794
e-mail: jkmpic@gmail.com
home: http://jkmpic.blogspot.com

Jatropha Seeds/plants for sale

Jatropha curcas
Regional Syn : (E) Barbados nut, Physic nut, Purging nut (S) Kananaeranda (H) Jangli arandi/Danti (B) Bon-bheranda (G) Jamalgota, Nepalo (Pr) Dandenahri.
(Nepalese) Ajaya pal(Tamil) Amanaku (Kannada) Damti (Konkani) Baktumbo(Gujrati) Ratanjoot)
Part Used : Leaf, Rootbark, Seed, Juice, Oil.
Constituents : Seed; Oil, Sugar, Starch, Albumin, Caseine,
Inorganic matter. Oil; Jatrophic
acid, Curcin, Phytosterol.
Action/Uses : Seed; acronarcotic. Seed & Oil; purgative, internally & externally
depurative
& antiseptic. Leaf; lactagogue. Stem juice; haemostatic & styptic. Rootbark;
stomachic, astringent.
Used in; dyspepsia, diarrhoea, to cure bleeding, spongy gum, as poultice on boils.

The JK Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre Srinagar is responsible for development of 50 well known Medicinal/Fruit/Ornamental plants.  JKMPIC one  of  the premier institution  involved in production,  development, introduction, & manufacturing of  Medicinal, Fruit,  Ornamental Plants and seeds.

(The seeds  and planting material is available for distribution/purchase for growers only)

The Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre offers  superior quality organic/open polinated fresh and dry jatropha seeds, Jatropha Curcas Seedlings for NGOs, Institutions, Universities, Farmers and Garden lovers spread across the nation. These quality jatropha seeds are the richest source for bio diesel fuel and are in high demand by our clients. We also meet customized requirement for our clients benefit.

Available in 100 seeds/Pkt

More details: JK Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre-JKMPIC
POB: 667 GPO Srinagar SGR JK 190001
(Via New Delhi-India)
More details: http://jkmpic.blogspot.com
e-mail: jkmpic@gmail.com
Ph: 01933-223705
Mob: 09858986794

Kashmir Saffron Industry

जम्मू और कश्मीर औषधीय पादपों परिचय केंद्र, अपनी तरह भगवा गुणा बीज (SMSC) कश्मीर में बीज गुणा केन्द्र पर देश के 5 हेक्टेयर से अधिक नर्सरी Corms की पहली बार एक सेटअप है. केसर नर्सरी कृषि मंत्री ने वाइस चेयरमैन जम्मू और कश्मीर औषधीय पादपों परिचय केंद्र Sheikh Gulzaar के साथ निरीक्षण किया गया था. एक आधिकारिक बयान में कहा है कि नर्सरी 5 हेक्टेयर के एक क्षेत्र और स्वस्थ पांचवें calibar केसर की 3000 किलो अधिक वैज्ञानिक आधार पर विकसित किया गया है corms में लगाया है कि बारी में भगवा तहत अपने केसर किसानों के बीच वितरण के लिए तीन गुना अधिक केसर बीज corms का उत्पादन होगा मिशन. जम्मू और कश्मीर औषधीय पादपों परिचय केंद्र केसर बीज corms के बीज गुणन के लिए नर्सरी में दो प्रौद्योगिकियों को अपनाया है, एक पारंपरिक है जो पंपोर और दूसरा Kareves में मुख्य रूप से प्रयोग किया जाता है स्पेनिश प्रौद्योगिकी है.

अधिक जानकारी से प्राप्त किया जा सकता है: -
जे के औषधीय संयंत्रों परिचय केंद्र (आर एंड डी)
भीड़: 09858986794
फोन: 01933-223705
e.mail: jkmpic@gmail.com
वेब: http://jkmpic.blogspot.com

Palm-Livistonia chinensis seeds for sale

Common Name:  Chinese Fan Palm
Botanical Name:  Livistonia chinensis
Subfamily :  Coryphoideae
Plant Type Solitary Fan Palm Tree
Origin :  China, southern Japan
Height 25'
Rate of Growth : Slow
Salt Tolerance : Moderate
Soil Requirements :  Widely adaptable
Water Requirements : High drought tolerance
Nutritional Requirements : Moderate
Light Requirements : Moderate, High
Form :   Solitary fan palm, canopy of 30-50 leaves
Leaves:  Costapalmate, divided to 2/3 into 60-100 deeply split segments that are pendant in their lower half, olive-green in color.
Inflorescence : 6' long, produced from among the leaves
Fruits : Grayish-blue. 1/2 - 1" long
Pests or diseases :  None of consequence
Uses :  Specimen plant
Bad Habits : Slightly susceptible to lethal yellowing
Propagation :   Seed, germinates in 1-2 months

Palm-Livistonia chinensis seeds are available with us in bulk for planting purpose
(All our medicinal seeds are open-pollinated)

Available packs: 100,200,500,1000,2000 seeds
Per seed: Rs. 10
More details: jkmpic@gmail.com
Home: http://jkmpic.blogspot.com
Ph: (R&D). 09858986794, 01933-223705

Crataegus oxyacantha seeds for sale

Howthorn berries
Hawthorn-Crataegus oxyacantha
Synonyms: Crataegus oxyacantha, Crataegus oxyacanthoides
Family : Rosaceae (Rose Family)
Medicinal use of Crataegus oxyacantha : Hawthorn-Crataegus oxyacantha  is an extremely valuable medicinal herb. It is used mainly for treating disorders of the heart and circulation system, especially angina. Western herbalists consider it a "food for the heart", it increases the blood flow to the heart muscles and restores normal heart beat. This effect is brought about by the presence of bioflavonoids in the fruit, these bioflavonoids are also strongly antioxidant, helping to prevent or reduce degeneration of the blood vessels. The fruit is antispasmodic, cardiac, diuretic, sedative, tonic and vasodilator. Both the fruits and flowers of hawthorns are well-known in herbal folk medicine as a heart tonic and modern research has borne out this use. The fruits and flowers have a hypotensive effect as well as acting as a direct and mild heart tonic. They are especially indicated in the treatment of weak heart combined with high blood pressure, they are also used to treat a heart muscle weakened by age, for inflammation of the heart muscle, arteriosclerosis and for nervous heart problems. Prolonged use is necessary for the treatment to be efficacious. It is normally used either as a tea or a tincture. Hawthorn is combined with ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) to enhance poor memory, working by improving the blood supply to the brain. The bark is astringent and has been used in the treatment of malaria and other fevers. The roots are said to stimulate the arteries of the heart.

Description of the plant:
Plant : Deciduous Shrub
Height : 6 m (20 feet)
Flovering : April to May
Scent : Scented Shrub

Edible parts of
Crataegus oxyacantha : Fruit - raw or cooked. A dry and mealy texture, they are not very appetizing. The fruit can be used for jams and preserves. The fruit pulp can be dried, ground into a meal and mixed with flour in making bread etc. The fruit is about 1cm in diameter. There are up to five fairly large seeds in the centre of the fruit, these often stick together and so the effect is of eating a cherry-like fruit with a single seed. Young leaves and young shoots - raw. A tasty nibble, they are nice in a salad. Young leaves are a tea substitute. The roasted seed is a coffee substitute.

Other uses of the herb :
A good hedge plant, it is very tolerant of neglect and is able to regenerate if cut back severely, it makes a good thorny stock-proof barrier and resists very strong winds. It can be used in layered hedges. The plant is often used as a rootstock for several species of garden fruit such as the medlar (Mespilus germanica) and the pear (Pyrus communis sativa). Wood - very hard and tough but difficult to work. It has a fine grain and takes a beautiful polish but is seldom large enough to be of great value. It is used for tool handles and making small wooden articles etc. The wood is valued in turning and makes an excellent fuel, giving out a lot of heat, more so even than oak wood. Charcoal made from the wood is said to be able to melt pig iron without the aid of a blast.

Propagation of Crataegus oxyacantha :
Seed - this is best sown as soon as it is ripe in the autumn in a cold frame, some of the seed will germinate in the spring, though most will probably take another year. Stored seed can be very slow and erratic to germinate, it should be warm stratified for 3 months at 15 C and then cold stratified for another 3 months at 4 C. It may still take another 18 months to germinate. Scarifying the seed before stratifying it might reduce this time. Fermenting the seed for a few days in its own pulp may also speed up the germination process. Another possibility is to harvest the seed "green" (as soon as the embryo has fully developed but before the seedcoat hardens) and sow it immediately in a cold frame. If timed well, it can germinate in the spring. If you are only growing small quantities of plants, it is best to pot up the seedlings as soon as they are large enough to handle and grow them on in individual pots for their first year, planting them out in late spring into nursery beds or their final positions. When growing larger quantities, it might be best to sow them directly outdoors in a seedbed, but with protection from mice and other seed-eating creatures. Grow them on in the seedbed until large enough to plant out, but undercut the roots if they are to be left undisturbed for more than two years.

Available in 50, 100, 200, 500 seeds/Pkt
Note: All our organic seeds are open-pollinated varieties produced on the JKMPIC
Hawthorn-Crataegus oxyacantha seed/plant/berries are available at: 
The Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre
POB: 667 GPO Srinagar SGR JK 190001
Ph: 01933-223705
Mob: 09858986794
e-mail: jkmpic@gmail.com

Ginkgo biloba plants for sale

Ginkgo plants at: http://jkmpic.blogspot.com
The director, Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre JKMPIC, Sheikh Gulzaar planted Ginkgo biloba saplings in JKMPIC, North Kashmir here yesterday on Monday. While taking to media persons on the occasion, he said Ginkgo biloba  is a heritage tree of the country and as such is a protected plant. Until 2007, Ginkgo biloba plantation day was observed on March 21 “World Arboretum Day”. However, keeping in view the magnificent and majestic look and attachment and concern of the people of the country of Kashmir with this tree, Kashmir government decided to observe March 15 of every year as Ginkgo biloba  Plantation Day, since 2009.

The director said another advantage of pre-poning the date from March 21 to March 15 is that longer period for plantation. During last two years 12373 saplings of Ginkgo biloba  have been provided free of cost to the people for plantation in different areas of the country Jammu Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre has established nurseries for propagation of Ginkgo biloba saplings and during current plantation season and 93373 saplings are available for distribution.

Sheikh Gulzaar said that anybody who is interested in plantation of Ginkgo biloba tree can contact the concerned Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre and obtain Ginkgo biloba  plants.

As per the un-authentic data of 1970, about 42000 Ginkgo biloba trees of different age groups and sizes were existing in thecountry . But with the passage of time, turmoil, development programmes and population explosion,Ginkgo biloba  trees have faced the brunt of greed like the forest and other plants had to face.

Under such circumstances, JKMPIC took the serious initiative for raising the Ginkgo biloba saplings for sustained efforts for annual plantation of saplings.

In order to determine the actual number of existing Ginkgo biloba  trees in the Kashmir , a preliminary census was initiated by the Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre from 2002 which was completed in 2009.

Ginkgo biloba Plants Sales office at:
Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre
POB: 667 GPO Srinagar SGR Jammu and Kashmir 190001
Ph: 01933-223705
Mob: 09858986794
e-mail: jkmpic@gmail.com, iirc@rediffmail.com
home: http://jkmpic.blogspot.com

Portulaca oleracea seeds for sale

Portulaca oleracea herb
Portulaca oleracea
English name : Green Purslane
Family : Portulacaceae (Purslane Family)
Genus :     Portulaca
Species :  P. oleracea

Medicinal use of Portulaca oleracea :
The plant is antibacterial, antiscorbutic, depurative, diuretic and febrifuge. The leaves are a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids, which is thought to be important in preventing heart attacks and strengthening the immune system. Seed sources such as walnuts, however, are much richer sources. The fresh juice is used in the treatment of strangury, coughs, sores etc. The leaves are poulticed and applied to burns, both they and the plant juice are particularly effective in the treatment of skin diseases and insect stings. A tea made from the leaves is used in the treatment of stomach aches and headaches. The leaf juice is applied to earaches, it is also said to alleviate caterpillar stings. The leaves can be harvested at any time before the plant flowers, they are used fresh or dried. This remedy is not given to pregnant women or to patients with digestive problems. The seeds are tonic and vermifuge. They are prescribed for dyspepsia and opacities of the cornea.

Description of the plant:
Plant : Annual
Height : 25 cm (9 3/4 inch)

Flovering : The yellow flowers of common purslane are borne individually in the leaf axils or clustered at end of branches. There are five petals. The flowers open in teh sunshine. The fruit is a globular capsule. Flowering occurs in July through September.
Habitat of the herb : Fields, waste ground, roadside verges, cultivated ground and by the sea.

Occurrence :
Common purslane occurs in rich fertile soils, and can be troublesome in late summer seedings. Once established, common purslane is drought tolerant.

Distribution : Throughout Kashmir, Pakistan, Iran, Israile.

Edible parts of Portulaca oleracea : Leaves and stems - raw or cooked. The young leaves are a very acceptable addition to salads, their mucilaginous quality also making them a good substitute for okra as a thickener in soups. Older leaves are used as a potherb. The leaves have a somewhat sour flavour. A spicy and somewhat salty taste. The leaves are a source of omega-3 fatty acids, though seed sources such as walnuts are magnitudes richer. The leaves can be dried for later use.

Medicinal uses :
1.8% protein, 0.5% fat, 6.5% carbohydrate, 2.2% ash. Another analysis gives the following figures per 100g ZMB. 245 - 296 calories, 17.6 - 34.5g protein, 2.4 - 5.3g fat, 35.5 - 63.2g carbohydrate, 8.5 - 14.6g fibre, 15.9 - 24.7g ash, 898 - 2078mg calcium, 320 - 774mg phosphorus, 11.2 - 46.7mg iron, 55mg sodium, 505 - 3120mg potassium, 10560 - 20000ug B-carotene equivalent, 0.23 - 0.48mg thiamine, 1.12 - 1.6mg riboflavin, 5.58 - 6.72mg niacin and 168 - 333mg ascorbic acid. Seed - raw or cooked. The seed can be ground into a powder and mixed with cereals for use in gruels, bread, pancakes etc. The seed is rather small and fiddly to utilize. In arid areas of Australia the plants grow quite large and can produce 10, 000 seeds per plant, a person can harvest several pounds of seed in a day. The seeding plants are uprooted and placed in a pile on sheets or something similar, in a few days the seeds are shed and can be collected from the sheet. In Britain, however, yields are likely to be very low, especially in cool or wet summers. The seed contains (per 100g ZMB) 21g protein, 18.9g fat 3.4g ash. Fatty acids of the seeds are 10.9% palmitic, 3.7% stearic, 1.3% behenic, 28.7% oleic, 38.9% linoleic and 9.9% linolenic. The ash of burnt plants is used as a salt substitute.

Other uses : A common tasty vegetable of hills, consumed as salad and employed in soups.

Propagation of the herb :
Seed - for an early crop, the seed is best sown under protection in early spring and can then be planted out in late spring. Outdoor sowings in situ take place from late spring to late summer, successional sowings being made every two to three weeks if a constant supply of the leaves is required.

Cultivation of Portulaca oleracea :
Fields, waste ground, roadside verges, cultivated ground and by the sea.

Portulaca oleracea 100, 200/pkt. seeds are available at:
Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre
POB: 667 GPO Srinagar SGR JK 190001
(Via New Delhi-India)
Ph: 01933-223705
Mob: 09858986794
e-mail: jkmpic@gmail.com, jkmpic@yahoo.in

Withania somnifera seeds for sale

Scientific Name : Withania somnifera
Family  : Solanaceae
Common name : Winter cherry
Hindi : Ashwagandha
English : Winter cherry
Urdu: Takhume Asgandh
Part Used : Root
Habit and Distribution : An erect perennial shrubby plant with ovate leaves, clusters of small yellow flowers and ovoid red fruits at the nodes and in the axils of leaves, tuberous roots. Ashwagandha grows prolifically in Kashmir, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh.

Chemical constituents : The main constituent of alkaloids is withanine. The other alkaloids are somniferine, somnine, somniferinine, withananine, pseudo-withanine, tropine, pseudo-tropine, 3-a-gloyloxytropane, choline, cuscohygrine, isopelletierine, anaferine and anahydrine. The leaves contain steroidal lactones, which are commonly called withanolides.

Uses : Ashwagandha has been traditionally used for general debility, sexual debility and nerve exhaustion. Ashwagandha acts a good nutrient and hormonal function for thyroid, promote healing of tissues, improves physical endurance and support sound sleep. It is considered the primary adaptogenic Ayurvedic herb for its ability to build reserves for handling stressful conditions. Ashawagandha as an adaptogen. It was use in folk medicine against arthritis, asthma, cancer, candidiasis, colds, cough, cystitis, debility, diarrhea, fever, gynecopathy, hiccups, hypertension, inflammations, lumbago, nausea, piles, proctitis, psoriasis, rheumatism, ringworm, scabies, senility small pos, sores, syphilis, tuberculosis, tumors, typhoid and wounds.

Details on multiplication and distribution of elite planting/seed materials of medicinal and aromatic crops at jkmpic@gmail.com
Write to us at: The Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre
POB: 667 GPO Srinagar SGR J&K 190001

Registered off:-Ist street, Shaheed-e-Azemat Road, Nambalbal, Pampore PPR J&K 192121
R&D (Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre at Sonamarag
Ph: 01933-223705
Mob: 09858986794
home: http://jkmpic.blogspot.com

Althaea officinalis Linn seeds/plants for sale

Althaea officinalis Linn.
Family: Malvaceae (Mallow Family)
Cashmerian name : Sazamool
Arabic name : Kasirul Munfiyat, Bazrul Khatmi, Gulkhairo
Chinese name : Ke zhi gen
English name : Sweet Weed, Mallards, Mortification Root,
French name : Guimauve
German name : Eibisch, Heilwurz, Ibischwurz, Sammetpappel
Hindi name : Khatmi
Marathi name : Khatmi
Persian name : Tukhme Khatmi (Fruits), Raisha Khatmi (Roots)
Sanskrit name : Gulkairo, Khatmi
Urdu name : Tukhme Khatmi

Medicinal use of Althaea officinalis Linn : The herb, not the white puffy confection roasted over a campfire—has been used for centuries as both a food and a medicine. It is alterative, antacid, antiinflammatory, antispasmodic, antitussive, aphrodisiac, demulcent, diuretic, emollient, expectorant, galactagogue, immune tonic, laxative, nutritive, rejuvenative and soothing. Althaea comes from the Latin ‘altho’ meaning ‘to heal’. Marshmallow’s demulcent qualities bring relief to bronchial asthma, sore throat, bronchial catarrh, pleurisy and when there is dry cough. Also useful in intestinal disorders like colitis, diverticulitis and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It is also used for irritation of the oral and pharyngeal mucosa and mild inflammation of the gastric mucosa. It also stimulates the immune system and production of white blood cells. It is a natural source of beta-carotene, amino acids, minerals and vitamins. Soothes infection and irritation from kidney and bladder stones.

Planting material available : Olive,Kiwi, Picanut,Hazelnut, and herbal seeds. 
more : http://jkmpic.blogspot.com

This herb has a high mucilage content (is highest in the root, about 11%), which calm inflammation, nourishes bone marrow, soothes and moistens the skin, and promotes tissue healing.

Recommended Dosage: Seeds :
3 to 5 g powder; Root : 5 to 7 g powder.
Contraindication : This herb has no known warnings or contraindications but diabetics need to take account of the sugar content.

Althaea officinalis Linn  is a very useful household medicinal herb. Its soothing demulcent properties make it very effective in treating inflammations and irritations of the mucous membranes such as the alimentary canal, the urinary and the respiratory organs. The root counters excess stomach acid, peptic ulceration and gastritis. It is also applied externally to bruises, sprains, aching muscles, insect bites, skin inflammations, splinters etc. The whole plant, but especially the root, is antitussive, demulcent, diuretic, highly emollient, slightly laxative and odontalgic. An infusion of the leaves is used to treat cystitis and frequent urination. The leaves are harvested in August when the plant is just coming into flower and can be dried for later use. The root can be used in an ointment for treating boils and abscesses. The root is best harvested in the autumn, preferably from 2 year old plants, and is dried for later use.

Description of the plant :
Plant : PerennialHeight : 120 cm (4 feet)Flovering : July to SeptemberHabitat of the herb : The upper margins of salt and brackish marshes, sides of ditches and grassy banks near the sea.

Edible parts of Althaea officinalis Linn : Leaves - raw or cooked. They are used as a potherb or to thicken soups. When used as a small proportion with other leaves, the taste and texture is acceptable, but if a lot of the leaves are cooked together their mucilaginous texture makes them unpalatable. The leaves can be eaten raw but are rather fibrous and somewhat hairy, though the taste is mild and pleasant. We have found them to be quite acceptable in salads when chopped up finely. Root - raw or cooked. When boiled and then fried with onions it is said to make a palatable dish that is often used in times of shortage. The root is used as a vegetable, it is also dried then ground into a powder, made into a paste and roasted to make the sweet "marshmallow". The root contains about 37% starch, 11% mucilage, 11% pectin. The water left over from cooking any part of the plant can be used as an egg-white substitute in making meringues etc. The water from the root is the most effective, it is concentrated by boiling until it has a similar consistency to egg white. A tea is made from the flowers. A tea can also be made from the root.


althaea officinalis seeds

Althaea officinalis Linn Roots, Leaves, Plants, Seeds & Flowers are available at :
The Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre
Ist street, Shaheed-e-Azemat Road, Nambalbal, Pampore PPR JK 192121
Mailing address: PO Box 667 GPO Srinagar SGR JK 190001
R&D/Plant Introduction Centre: Sonamarag
Ph: 01933-223705
Mob: 09858986794
e-mail: jkmpic@gmail.com
home: http://jkmpic.blogspot.com






Phytolacca acinosa seeds for sale

Phytolacca acinosa cashmerina
Family : PHYOLACCACEAE 
Habitat : Forest, Shrubberies, forest clearings, cultivated areas in forests, Valleys, hillsides, forest understories, forest margins and roadsides at elevations of 500 - 3400 metres. It is also found in cultivated land houses, moist fertile lands and as a weed.

Distribution : Temperate Himalaya: From Hazara Dovision to Kashmir to Gilgat,, to Bhuta, China, Afghanistan and Japan.

Botanical features : Perenial shrubby herb. Stem branched, dark green, fistular or solid, succulent. Leaves oblanceolate, entire, narrowed to short stalk. Flower clusters upto 15 cm, perianth segments 5, stamens 8-10. Fruit with 10-15  fleshy dark purple carpels.

Medicinal uses: Plants narcotic: Root oil used for pain in joints.
Other uses: Tender leaves of the variety with fistular stem cooke as a vegetable. fruit used as flovouring agent.  A red ink is obtained from the fruit.

Edible parts of Phytolacca acinosa : Leaves - they must be cooked, and are then used as a spinach. Only the young leaves should be used since the leaves become toxic with age. The young shoots are used as an asparagus substitute. They have an excellent flavour. Root - cooked. Must be leeched first. Only the white root of the white flowered form (if it exists!) should be eaten. See notes above.

Chemical constituents : Seed kernels yield a fatty oil. the fatty acid composition shows 8% of saturated and 92% of unsaturated acids. A toxic principle Phytolaccatoxin resembling picrotoxin is isolated from the seeds.

Medicinal use of  Phytolacca acinosa : The root is antiasthmatic, antibacterial, antidote, antifungal, antitussive, diuretic, expectorant, laxative and vermifuge. The plant has an interesting chemistry and it is currently (1995) being investigated as a potential anti-AIDS drug. It contains potent anti-inflammatory agents, antiviral proteins and substances that affect cell division. These compounds are toxic to many disease-causing organisms, including the water snails that cause schistosomiasis. The root is used internally in the treatment of urinary disorders, nephritis, oedema and abdominal distension. Externally, it is used to treat boils, carbuncles and sores. The roots are harvested in the autumn and dried for later use. All parts of the plant are toxic, this remedy should be used with caution and preferably under the supervision of a qualified practitioner.

Propagation of  Phytolacca acinosa : Seed - sow autumn or spring in a cold frame. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. If you have sufficient seed, it might be worthwhile trying an outdoor sowing in a seed bed in early spring. Grow the plants on in the seedbed for their first year and plant them out the following spring. Division in March or October. Use a sharp spade or knife to divide the rootstock, making sure that each section has at least one growth bud. Very easy, larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found that it is better to pot up the smaller divisions and grow them on in light shade in a cold frame until they are well established before planting them out in late spring or early summer.

Cultivation of the herb : In Kashmir, Valleys, hillsides, forest understories, forest margins and roadsides at elevations of 500 - 3400 metres. It is also found in cultivated land houses, moist fertile lands and as a weed.

Known hazards of  Phytolacca acinosa : The leaves are poisonous. They are said to be safe to eat when young, the toxins developing as they grow older. According to another report it is only a form with reddish purple flowers and a purple root that is poisonous.

Available in : 50,100, 200 seeds/Pkt
Vioble open pollinated Phytolacca acinosa seed/berries  are available at:

For more details about planting material:-
JK Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre
Ist Street, Shaheed-e-Azeemat Road, Nambalbal, Pampore PPR J&K 192121
Mailing address: PO Box 667 Srinagar SGR J&K- 190001
Ph: 01933-223705
Call us: 09858986794
e.mail: jkmpic@gmail.com, jkmpic@yahoo.in

Sage-Salvia officinalis seeds for sale

Sage-Salvia officinalis
Family        :  Labiatae
Hindi          :  Salvia, Sefakus
Malayalam  :  Salvi tulasi
Cahmerian  :  Green leaf
Bengali       :  Bui tulasi
Panjabi       :  Sathi
Arabic        :  Mayameeah
Chineese     :  Shu wei cao
Czech         :  Salvej
Dutch         :  Salie
French       :  Sauge
German      : Salbei
Italian         : Salvia
Spanish       :Salvia

Sage is a native of Mediterranean area. It grows wild in the Dalmatian region of Yugoslavia. It is cultivated in Kashmir, Yugoslavia, Italy, Albania, Pakistan, Iran, Turkey, Portugal, Spain, Cyprus, England, Canada and USA.

Chemical constituents :  Volatile oil, resin, tannin and a bitter principle. The oil is composed of camphore, salvene, cineol and pinene. The fresh leaves provide appreciable amounts of vitamin A and C.

Medicinal use of Sage :
Sage has a very long history of effective medicinal use and is an important domestic herbal remedy for disorders of the digestive system. Its antiseptic qualities make it an effective gargle for the mouth where it can heal sore throats, ulcers etc. The leaves applied to an aching tooth will often relieve the pain. The whole herb is antihydrotic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, astringent, carminative, cholagogue, galactofuge, stimulant, tonic and vasodilator. Sage is also used internally in the treatment of excessive lactation, night sweats, excessive salivation (as in Parkinson's disease), profuse perspiration (as in TB), anxiety, depression, female sterility and menopausal problems. Many herbalists believe that the purple-leafed forms of this species are more potent medicinally. This remedy should not be prescribed to pregnant women or to people who have epileptic fits. The plant is toxic in excess or when taken for extended periods - though the toxic dose is very large. Externally, it is used to treat insect bites, skin, throat, mouth and gum infections and vaginal discharge. The leaves are best harvested before the plant comes into flower and are dried for later use. The essential oil from the plant is used in small doses to remove heavy collections of mucous from the respiratory organs and mixed in embrocations for treating rheumatism. In larger doses, however, it can cause epileptic fits, giddiness etc. The essential oil is used in aromatherapy. Its keyword is "Tonic".

Other uses : Sage is one of the most popular expensive herbs in culinary preparations in the west. It helps counteract the harmful richness of foods like pork, goose, duck and oily fish. It also combines well with dairy foods, bean and pea soups. Dried and powdered leaves are mixed with cooked vegetables and sprinkled on cheese dishes. fresh  sage leaves are used in salads and sandwiches.

Description of the plant:
Plant : Evergreen Shrub
Height : 60-120 cm (2/4 feet)
Flovering : June to August
Scent : Scented Shrub

Habitat of the herb : Dry banks and stony places, usually in limestone areas and often where there is very little soil.

Edible parts of Sage : Leaves and flowers - raw or cooked. A very common herb, the strongly aromatic leaves are used as a flavouring in cooked foods. They are an aid to digestion and so are often used with heavy, oily foods. They impart a sausage-like flavour to savoury dishes. The young leaves and flowers can be eaten raw, boiled, pickled or used in sandwiches. The flowers can also be sprinkled on salads to add colour and fragrance. A herb tea is made from the fresh or dried leaves, it is said to improve the digestion. An essential oil obtained from the plant is used commercially to flavour ice cream, sweets, baked goods etc.

Other uses of the herb : The leaves make excellent tooth cleaners, simply rub the top side of the leaf over the teeth and gums. The purple-leafed form of sage has tougher leaves and is better for cleaning the teeth. The leaves have antiseptic properties and can heal diseased gums. An essential oil from the leaves is used in perfumery, hair shampoos (it is good for dark hair) and as a food flavouring. It is a very effective "fixer" in perfumes, and is also used to flavour toothpastes and is added to bio-activating cosmetics. The plant (the flowers?) is an alternative ingredient of "QR" herbal compost activator. This is a dried and powdered mixture of several herbs that can be added to a compost heap in order to speed up bacterial activity and thus shorten the time needed to make the compost. The growing or dried plant is said to repel insects, it is especially useful when grown amongst cabbages and carrots. It was formerly used as a strewing herb and has been burnt in rooms to fumigate them. A good dense ground cover plant for sunny positions, though it needs weeding for the first year or two. They are best spaced about 60cm apart each way.

Propagation of Sage : Seed - sow March/April or September in a greenhouse. Germination usually takes place within 2 weeks. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out in early summer. In areas where the plant is towards the limits of its hardiness, it is best to grow the plants on in a greenhouse for their first winter and plant them out in late spring of the following year.

Sage-Salvia officinalis seeds
No: of seeds : 100 seeds/per packet
Available : January to December


More details:
Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre
"Ginkgo House" Azizabad, Nambalbal, (Via Wuyan-Meej Road) Pampore PPR J&K 192121
POB: 667 GPO Srinagar SGR JK 190001
(Via New Delhi-India)

Ph: 01933-223705, 09858986794
e-mail: jkmpic@gmail.com, jkmpic@yahoo.in
home: http://jkmpic.blogspot.com

Viola odorata-Banafsha

Price Rs. 550/-US$20 (25 Seeds)
Sweet Violet
Latin name : Viola odorata Cashmerina
Family : Violaceae (Violet Family)
Arabic Name : Farfeer, Banafsaj
Cashmerian Name: Nun Posh
Bengali Name : Banopa, Baga Banusa
Chinese Name : Zi Hua Di Ding
English Name : Sweet Violet, Sweet-Scented Violet, Garden Violet, Heartease
French Name : Violette Douce
German Name : Duftveilchen, Heckenveilchen, Märzveilchen.
Gujarati Name : Bahapa, Bahaphsa 
Hindi Name : Banaphsha
Marathi Name : Bugabanosa
Persian Name : Banafsha
Punjabi Name : Banafsha
Sanskrit Name : Neelapushpa
Urdu Name : Berge Banafsha (Leaf), Gul Banafsha (Flower)

Habitat : Shrubberies, forest clearings, rocky and shady areas; mud walls, hedgebanks.

Distribution : Gilgat (Azad Kashmir), Pakistan, IRAN, Kashmir, North Aferica, North and West Asia.

Botanical features : Perennial herbs with stout creeping rootstock, Leaves all radical, upto 3 cm diam., petiolate, stipules elongated, leafy. Flowers pinkish-blue or purplish, with long pedicels. Capsule 3-sided.

Medicinal use of Sweet Violet :
Sweet violet has a long and proven history of folk use, especially in the treatment of cancer and whooping cough. It also contains salicylic acid, which is used to make aspirin. It is therefore effective in the treatment of headaches, migraine and insomnia. The whole plant is anti-inflammatory, diaphoretic, diuretic, emollient, expectorant, and laxative. It is taken internally in the treatment of bronchitis, respiratory catarrh, coughs, asthma, and cancer of the breast, lungs or digestive tract. Externally, it is used to treat mouth and throat infections. The plant can either be used fresh, or harvested when it comes into flower and then be dried for later use. The flowers are demulcent and emollient. They are used in the treatment of biliousness and lung troubles. The petals are made into a syrup and used in the treatment of infantile disorders. The roots is a much stronger expectorant than other parts of the plant but they also contain the alkaloid violine which at higher doses is strongly emetic and purgative. They are gathered in the autumn and dried for later use. The seeds are diuretic and purgative. They have been used in the treatment of urinary complaints are considered to be a good remedy for gravel. A homeopathic remedy is made from the whole fresh plant. It is considered useful in the treatment of spasmodic coughs and rheumatism of the wrist. An essential oil from the flowers is used in aromatherapy in the treatment of bronchial complaints, exhaustion and skin complaints.

Chemical constituents : Rhizomes contain glycoside-methyl salicylate, an alkaloid violine, a glycoside-violequarcitin which is identical to rutin, and saponin. Leaves and flowers contain methl salicylate.
Description of the plant:

Plant : Evergreen Perennial
Height : 10 cm (4 inches)
Flovering : February to April
Scent : Scented Perennial
Habitat of the herb : Fields, hedgerows and woodlands, especially on calcareous soils.

Edible parts of Sweet Violet : Young leaves and flower buds - raw or cooked. Usually available all through the winter. The leaves have a very mild flavour, though they soon become quite tough as they grow older. They make a very good salad, their mild flavour enabling them to be used in bulk whilst other stronger-tasting leaves can then be added to give more flavour. When added to soup they thicken it in much the same way as okra. Also used as a flavouring in puddings etc. A tea can be made from the leaves. Flowers - raw. Used to decorate salads and desserts. A sweet mild flavour with a delicate perfume, the flowers are an especially welcome decoration for the salad bowl since they are available in late winter. The flowers are also used fresh to flavour and colour confectionery. A soothing tea can be made from the leaves and flowers. A leaf extract is used to flavour sweets, baked goods and ice cream.

Other uses of the herb :
An essential oil from the flowers and leaves is used in perfumery. 1000kg of leaves produces about 300 - 400g absolute. The flowers are used to flavour breath fresheners. A pigment extracted from the flowers is used as a litmus to test for acids and alkalines. Plants can be grown as a ground cover when spaced about 30cm apart each way. They make an effective weed-excluding cover.

Propagation of Sweet Violet :
Seed - best sown in the autumn in a cold frame. The seed requires a period of cold stratification and the germination of stored seed can be erratic. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out in the summer. Division in the autumn or just after flowering. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions, though we have found that it is best to pot up smaller divisions and grow them on in light shade in a greenhouse or cold frame until they are growing away well. Plant them out in the summer or the following spring.

Cultivation of the herb : Fields, hedgerows and woodlands, especially on calcareous soils.
Known hazards of Viola odorata : None known
Plant information taken from the Plants For A Future/JKMPIC/International Info.Resource Centre

More details: Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre-JKMPIC
Ist street, Shaheed-e-Azemat Raod, Nambalbal, Pampore PPR JK 192121
Mailing address: POB: 667 GPO Srinagar SGR JK 190001
Ph: 01933-223705
Mob: 09858986794
e-mail: jkmpic@gmail.com, jkmpic@yahoo.in
home: http://jkmpic.blogspot.com