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Chenopodium album seeds

Chenopodium album plant
Chenopodium album plants
Synonyms: Chenopodium reticulatum
Family: Chenopodiaceae (Goosefoot Family)

Medicinal use of Chenopodium album : Chenopodium album is not employed in herbal medicine, though it does have some gentle medicinal properties and is a very nutritious and healthy addition to the diet. The leaves are anthelmintic, antiphlogistic, antirheumatic, mildly laxative, odontalgic. An infusion is taken in the treatment of rheumatism. The leaves are applied as a wash or poultice to bug bites, sunstroke, rheumatic joints and swollen feet, whilst a decoction is used for carious teeth. The seeds are chewed in the treatment of urinary problems and are considered useful for relieving the discharge of semen through the urine. The juice of the stems is applied to freckles and sunburn. The juice of the root is used in the treatment of bloody dysentery. Food that comprises 25.5% of the powdered herb may suppress the oestrus cycle.

Packets contain approximately 250 seeds
Chenopodium album leaves, Chenopodium album plant, Chenopodium album seed
also available

The Jammu and Kashmir medicinal Plants Introduction Centre
"Ginkgo House", Nambalbal, New Coloney Azizabad, 

Via Wuyan-Meej Road, Pampore PPR J&K 192121
Mob : 09858986794
Ph: 01933-223705
e-mail: jkmpic@gmail.com
home: http://jkmpic.blogspot.in


Columbine seeds

Aquilegia pubiflora 
Aquilegia pubiflora 
Family : Ranunculaceae
Once, while walking in the valley of Kashmir, I rounded a bend and there, spread in front of me was a carpet of blue-violet columbines in a sun-dappled grove of conifers and maples.

A breeze was gently rippling through them, turning their delicate heads this way and that rather like butterflies fluttering in the breeze. Columbines grow at a height of 2500-3300 m. on open slopes and semi-shaded groves in the Himalayas all along from the west to the east.
They bloom from early June to August.

Columbines are very elegantly formed and coloured in shades of lilac, purple and pinky-violet. The flower is very easy to distinguish because of the five backward projecting spurs of the inner petals.
The spurs are full of nectar.

A row of inner and outer petals forms the columbine, which grows in a drooping fashion. The leaves are divided into three lobes with crenate edges and look rather ferny .

The columbine was once used as a medicinal plant in the past centuries in Europe and was used as a garnish for food. It has been used in homeopathy for troubles of the nervous system. There are several varieties of this flower found in the Himalayas. Many garden varieties of the columbine have been developed and are grown in hill gardens.

The botanical name of the columbine Aquilegia comes from the Latin aquila, an eagle, referring to the claw-like spurs. The name columbine supposedly comes from columba, a dove; the outer petals with the spurs resemble a group of pigeons clustered around a dish, a motif often used in fountain


Packets contain approximately 100 seeds

The Jammu and Kashmir medicinal Plants Introduction Centre
"Ginkgo House", Nambalbal, New Coloney Azizabad, Via Wuyan-Meej Road, Pampore PPR J&K 192121
Mob:09858986794
Ph: 01933-223705
e-mail: jkmpic@gmail.com
home: http://jkmpic.blogspot.in

Horse Chestnut fruit seeds for sale

Bot. name: Aesculus indica
Synonyms: Pavia indica
Family: Hippocastanaceae (Horse-chestnut Family)

Medicinal use of Horse Chestnut : The seed is astringent, acrid and narcotic. An oil from the seed is applied externally in the  treatment of skin disease and rheumatism. The juice of the bark is also used to treat rheumatism.

A paste made from the oil cake is applied to the forehead to relieve headaches.
The seed is given to horses suffering from colic. It is also used as an anthelmintic on horses to rid them of intestinal parasites.

Seed - cooked. It can be dried, ground into a powder and used as a gruel. The seed is roasted then eaten in Nepal. It is also dried then ground into a flour and used with wheat flour to develop the flavour when making bread. The seed is quite large, about 35mm in diameter, and is easily harvested. Unfortunately it also contains toxic saponins and these need to be removed before it can be eaten. The seed is used as an emergency food in times of famine when all else fails. It is dried and ground into a powder, this is then soaked in water for about 12 hours before use in order to remove the bitter saponins and can be used to make a "halva". It is estimated that mature trees yield about 60kg of seeds per annum in the wild. See also the notes above on toxicity.

Other uses of the herb: Saponins in the seed are used as a soap substitute. The saponins can be easily obtained by chopping the seed into small pieces and infusing them in hot water. This water can then be used for washing the body, clothes etc. Its main drawback is a lingering odour of horse chestnuts. Wood - soft, close grained. Used for construction, cases, spoons, cups etc.

Propagation of  Chestnut : Seed - best sown outdoors or in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe. The seed germinates almost immediately and must be given protection from severe weather. The seed has a very limited viability and must not be allowed to dry out. Stored seed should be soaked for 24 hours prior to sowing and even after this may still not be viable. It is best to sow the seed with its "scar" downwards. If sowing the seed in a cold frame, pot up the seedlings in early spring and plant them out into their permanent positions in the summer.


Packets contain approximately 100 seeds
Buy Chestnut seed
Buy Chestnut plant
Buy Aesculus indica plant fruit seeds
(only for Research purpose) 

The Jammu and Kashmir medicinal Plants Introduction Centre
"Ginkgo House", Nambalbal, New Coloney Azizabad, 

Via Wuyan-Meej Road, Pampore PPR J&K 192121
Mob:09858986794
Ph: 01933-223705
e-mail: jkmpic@gmail.com
home: http://jkmpic.blogspot.in